Poetry

Sarah Manguso

MangusoCheck out, Sarah Manguso.  Her website lists her books, and connects to lots of her articles.  Is what she does “prose poetry”? Probably.  But it doesn’t matter. It’s phenomenal. Tightly written short pieces.  Often autobiographical.  She has re-awoken my interest in prose poems.

Prose

300 Arguments (Graywolf, 2017)
Ongoingness: The End of a Diary (Graywolf, 2015)
The Guardians: An Elegy (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2012)
The Two Kinds of Decay (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2008)
Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape (McSweeney’s Books, 2007)

Poetry

Siste Viator (Four Way Books, 2006)
The Captain Lands in Paradise (Alice James Books, 2002)

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Tom Raworth

It’s hard for me to get my head around the fact that this dear man is no longer with us.  His work is extraordinary, but his presence was inspirational every time I was with him.

Guardian Obituary

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2017/02/tom-raworth-1938-2017/

https://tarpaulinsky.com/2017/02/memoriam-tom-raworth/

The other week, we wrote about British poet Tom Raworth, who had announced he was dying. Late Wednesday, American poet Charles Bernsteinconfirmed on social media, Raworth let go peacefully at home, surrounded by family. His wife Val called it “a release from his sufferings.” The Poetry Foundation has written a wonderful obituary, remembering Raworth as “a funny, warm, sprightly gentleman, who seemed to know exactly how we he wanted to live.” In his final weeks, rumors that the candle had gone out erupted several times, only to prove untrue, leading Bernstein to observe, “The intensity of the vigil is the measure of how much he meant to both those who knew him and those who know him by his work.”

https://www.mhpbooks.com/british-poet-tom-raworth-is-dying/

http://dispatchespoetry.com/articles/news/2017/03/1032

http://cuneiformpress.com/?p=2846

http://robertsheppard.blogspot.com/2017/02/robert-sheppard-im-tom-raworth-from.html

http://allenginsberg.org/2017/02/tom-raworth-1938-2017/

http://toddswift.blogspot.com/2017/02/tom-raworth-has-died.html

http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/tomraworth/

http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2017/02/tom-raworth-1938-2017-by-michael-lally.html

Book Notes – Fred Marchant

My good friend, Fred Marchant has contributed to this series at Largehearted Boy

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

The poems in Fred Marchant’s autobiographical collection Said Not Said generously observed and filled with wisdom.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:
“Poet, editor, and translator Marchant displays an unflinching tenderness in a collection of sonically and architecturally precise poems. Whether describing mental violence or political conflict, he seeks the humanity in despair and the spirit of dreams and memories.”

In his own words, here is Fred Marchant ‘s Book Notes music playlist for his poetry collection Said Not Said:

Fred’s Playlist

Your read what Fred has to say about the music here at Largehearted Boy

Tribute to C.D. Wright by Anna Ross

ON NOT JOINING: REMEMBERING C.D. WRIGHT

by Anna Ross

C .D. Wright, Language poet; C.D. Wright, elliptical poet; C.D. Wright, poet of the Ozarks, of Arkansas, erotic poet, poet of conscience, of place, of reportage, ekphrastic poet, elegiac poet. Poetry is the weird one: funny-looking on the page, resolutely non-commercial, refusing the neat thesis or linear narrative, and those of us who practice it often find ourselves in a defensive, explanatory crouch in the face of the question “So, what kind of poetry do you write?” As often, we acquiesce, labeling ourselves by school or influence either out of guilt for having introduced the awkward subject in the first place with our presence or because the stage, by its smallness, invites division. C. D. Wright, whom we lost suddenly and much too soon just over a week ago, never succumbed to this pressure. As she wrote in her National Book Critic’s Circle Award-winning One With Others, a book-length telling of Wright’s friend “V’s” participation in the 1969 Arkansas March Against Fear and the repercussions of that act, “[Where was it you wanted to bury this hatchet. Your land or mine.]”

 

Read more of Anna’s essay download